John Locke

John Locke

The idea of consent is a key element in the works of John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. In the ?Second Treatise of Government,? Locke puts forth his conception of the ideal form of government based on a social contract. As Locke develops his theory of consent, he also incorporates theories of political obligation on the part of all citizens of his state as well as his theory of revolution and the conditions under which rebellion is permissible. Though Locke may appear to have explored the notion of consent completely, there are some problems with his theory that weaken its impact. (Kant vs. Locke on the Right to Rebel)

John Locke powerfully details the benefits of consent as a principle element of government, guaranteed by a social contract. Locke believes in the establishment of a social compact among people of a society that is unique in its ability to eliminate the state of nature. Locke feels the contract must end the state of nature agreeably because in the state of nature ?every one has executive power of the law of nature.? Therefore, Locke maintains that a government must be established with the consent of all that will ?restrain the partiality and violence

government, locke, consent, people, society, social, power, political, men, against, state, must, contract, theory, new, nature, moral, community, collective, citizens, rights, right, own, one, force, authority, without, while, way, upon, trust, through, therefore, rule, revolution

 

What The Best Trick On School Life? View page http://writingtips.magnoto.com/